New Brunswick Tribune

Wednesday, January 26, 2022

The “Winter Covid-Plan” in New Brunswick targets religious services

N.B "Winter Covid-Plan" targets religious services

Key takeaways:

  • The Justice Centre has sent a warning letter to the Minister of Justice of New Brunswick in response to the most recent Covid-19 Order, dated December 4, 2021.
  • The Order says that individual supermarkets can set their immunization requirements for admittance.

In response to the most recent Covid-19 Order dated December 4, 2021, the Justice Centre filed a warning letter today to the New Brunswick Minister of Justice.

The Order discriminates against persons of all faiths who attend funerals, marriages, and social gatherings by forcing owners and occupiers to verify that all occupants are completely vaccinated, whereas non-faith gatherings are exempt.

Also read: N.B. reports 69 new cases, with anyone 50 and up receiving a booster dosage

Part of the Order reads:

“While paragraph 2 does not apply to every church or other faith venue, the owners, occupiers, and managers of those venues must take all reasonable means to ensure that everybody in the venue is adequately vaccinated against COVID-19 at every indoor faith meeting.”

“This is an egregious breach of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms of Canada, with no scientific or legal justification.” Andre Memauri, a Justice Centre staff lawyer, agrees. “Vaccine-free New Brunswickers who are mourning the loss of a family member are not permitted in to a pool hall with a negative test yet are permitted into a funeral.”

The Order says that individual supermarkets can set their immunization requirements for admittance. The right to food is established in numerous international documents, including Social, Article 25 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and Article 11 of the International Covenant on Economic and Cultural Rights.

Mr. Memauri claims that inviting the private sector to consider such flagrant discriminatory practices results in historic Charter violations. “It is an act of cruelty to deprive citizens of their meals.” It’s unjust, unconstitutional, and probably illegal under international law. Mr. Memauri believes that no one should be denied the ability to buy food for their family.

“In Canada, we can do better than this.”

Source: Justice Centre

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