New Brunswick Tribune

Wednesday, January 26, 2022

Harvest Manitoba is dealing with a ‘triple whammy’ of rising food prices

Harvest Manitoba is suffering from a "triple whammy" of rising food costs

Key takeaways:

  • According to Harvest Manitoba, food prices are expected to rise in the coming months, putting a strain on the food bank.
  • According to Barletta, Harvest has already seen a rise in food costs in recent months due to the pandemic and shipping disruptions.

Food costs are predicted to increase in the coming months, according to Harvest Manitoba, and this will hit the food bank hard just when it’s needed the most.

According to a recent survey, food prices are expected to rise by as much as 7% by 2022, adding nearly $1,000 to the average family of four’s annual grocery bill.

According to Harvest Manitoba president and CEO Vince Barletta, this means the food bank is preparing for an increase in clientele while also looking for ways to control rising costs.

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He claims that Harvest has seen a 75 percent increase in new hamper sign-ups in the last few months.

According to 680 CJOB, there are currently 85,000 people who rely on the food bank every month.

“Those are record numbers,” he said, “that we haven’t seen since the start of the pandemic.”

“We’re expecting… In the coming months, those figures will continue to rise.”

According to the 12th edition of Canada’s Food Price Report, a family of four in Canada will pay $966 more for food in 2022, for a total annual grocery bill of $14,767.

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Harvest Manitoba is suffering from a “triple whammy” of rising food costs. Image from Winnipeg free press

It’s the biggest increase the annual food price report has ever predicted.

According to Barletta, Harvest has already seen a rise in food costs in recent months due to the pandemic and shipping disruptions.

Harvest has been able to meet the need with current levels of donations and volunteers, he says, but there is concern that donations will dry up as everyone’s cost of living rises.

“When food prices go up, it’s not just those on the bottom rung who get pinched; it’s everyone,” he explained.

“For the average family, putting that tin in the bin for Harvest may be more difficult.

“We’re dealing with a triple whammy of requirements.”

Source: Global News

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