New Brunswick Tribune

The New Brunswick Naval Memorial had its ground-breaking ceremony

Key sentence:

  • On Remembrance Day, a groundbreaking ceremony for a memorial honouring New Brunswick’s participation in the country’s naval.
  • A facsimile of the bow of the HMCS Saint John, complete with anchors, will be displayed at the memorial. 

On Remembrance Day, a groundbreaking ceremony for a memorial honouring New Brunswick’s participation in the country’s naval and maritime legacy was held in Saint John.

The New Brunswick Naval Memorial will be erected at Fort La Tour in Harbour Passage.

On Thursday, officials turned the sod and detailed the project’s vision.

“The aim here is to have a memorial that teaches, celebrates, and honours those who contributed to our wonderful province’s navy and maritime heritage,” retired naval Capt. Paul Dempsey, chair of the New Brunswick naval memorial committee, said at the ceremony.

“It is critical to remember those who made the ultimate sacrifice in defence of our country.”

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Construction is programmed to start on May 2, 2019, following Battle of the Atlantic Sunday, which remembers the sacrifices of those who died in the battle.

Canada played an important role in the Conflict of the Atlantic, the longest battle of World War II.

Visitors would know more regarding the Royal Canadian Navy and sailors, aviators, soldiers, commercial seafarers, shipbuilders, and port workers after the memorial is finished.

Groundbreaking ceremony held for New Brunswick Naval Memorial.

A facsimile of the bow of the HMCS Saint John, complete with anchors, will be displayed at the memorial. The identities of the Royal Canadian Navy ships lost at the Battle of the Atlantic will also be engraved on the bow’s stern in memoriam.

The beautiful closeness to the Port of Saint John and HMCS Brunswicker, a Canadian Forces Naval Reserve Division, makes the location excellent.

The harbour was also thought to be excellent for the city’s renowned shipbuilding tradition.

“We know that nine of the twelve Halifax class ships were built right here in this city,” said Dempsey, who captained one of those ships, the HMCS Montreal.

The project’s completion is contingent on funding, but it is hoped to be completed by the fall of 2022.

Dempsey estimates that the overall cost will be around $750,000, noting that fundraising efforts have already gotten them halfway there.

“Fundraising is still going on, and this project would not be possible without the community’s help,” he stated.

Source: Global News

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